Thursday, April 20, 2017




The Howell Foundation hosted its first North County event with key note speaker Janelle Ayers, Ph.D from the Salk Institute, who walked us through the history of the development of antibiotic resistance and how we fight disease in the twenty first century.  She is currently researching the pathways to winning the war against antibiotic resistance in bacterial infections.

In the continuous fight to beat infectious disease, history has shown us that the use of antibiotics will kill the infection, along with the healthy bacteria that might keep us from fighting the infection.  Bacteria have genetic mutations that are resistant to antibiotics, and we, in turn, just keep on developing antibiotics to rid new strains of bacteria.  We are running out of of options in antibiotic development to beat infectious disease.  And the cycle continues...

So the question still remains:  will our bodies be able to fight infectious disease on their own?  Her answer is YES!  For Dr. Ayers, it's all about how we SURVIVE bacterial infections -- vs. how do we FIGHT them.  "Treatment of infectious disease in the US relies on antibiotics for successful treatment", comments Ayers.

Her research is based on history.  She referenced the treatment of tuberculosis at the beginning of the 20th century, when the 'sanitarium movement' sought to treat the disease with the basics:  complete rest, good nutrition and plenty of sun.  Granted this treatment lasted for a year, but it does shed light on the fact that in today's world a patient with TB would be able to get cured without the use of antibiotics!

When we get an infection, our immune system is capable of recognizing it, engaging a series of interactions to fight against it; sometimes damaging our organs.  The antibiotic will kill the pathogen creating the infection, but will not address the potential organ damage the infection creates.  Dr. Ayers' theory centers around strengthening the pathology of the organ(s) during the infection and harness them for therapeutic purposes; perhaps develop drugs that can address the physiological damage of an infectious disease. "Our bodies encode a defense system to fight disease.  By understanding how it works and what genes are involved in creating this 'defense system', we can leverage research results to treat both infectious and non-infectious disease."

Enter the human microbiome and the trillions of microbes and bacterial species that live in our bodies.  Research shows that the microbiome universe is responsible for optimal physiological function and health.  A healthy microbiome will have a positive impact in both our immune and metabolic systems, as well as intestinal, brain, and lung function.  On the contrary, changes in the microbiome have been associated with diseases such as autism, asthma, cancer, diabetes, and arthritis.   Our microbiome IS responsible for turning on these 'damage control' mechanisms in our bodies to ensure health.  The challenge continues to be the separation of microbes from healthy and sick bodies to learn which microbes are protective against disease, and to potentially utilize isolated microbes for drug design.

Dr. Ayres's lab put the theory to the test.  After inserting bacterial pneumonia-induced pathogens in mice, it was discovered that although antibiotics had taken care of the infections, the muscle-wasting effect of the infection was still present.  Furthermore, when introducing E-coli bacterium into the infected body, its own 'defense mechanism' was able to heal the infected mice and minimized the muscle wasting effect of the infection.  

Although the results of this approach were highly positive, some additional approaches can sometimes be... well, plain and 'unsophisticated' for some.  Dr. Ayers is researching 'poop' as medicine to understand the role microbes play as damage control mechanisms in hopes to develop a preventive approach to infectious disease.  It is not the first time we have heard about this s!*t before (pun intended!).  In 2015, the Howell Foundation hosted Dr. Highlander, who was gracious enough to introduce novel treatment of bacterial disease through the use of poop pills and fecal transplants during lunch!

But going back the Salk Institute and Dr. Ayers' research lab, ongoing efforts to treat infectious disease with the use of microbes include pre-clinical trials with animals that suffer from insulin resistance, sepsis, salmonella, poor cardiac function, pneumonia and inflammatory bowel disease, just to mention a few.  The conclusion is concise: the way to fight infectious disease and the overuse of antibiotics is through our own microbes.  A healthy biome is the cornerstone of our health!


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About the Doris A. Howell Foundation:

The Doris A. Howell Foundation for Women’s Health Research is committed to keeping the women we love healthy, advancing women’s health through research and educating women to be catalysts for improving family health in the community.

The organization does so by funding scholarships to students researching issues affecting women’s health; providing a forum for medical experts, scientists, doctors, and researchers to convey timely information on topics relevant to women’s health and the health of their families through its Lecture and Evening Series, and by funding research initiatives that improve the health of under-served women and increase awareness and advocacy in the community.

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Thursday, March 30, 2017

TODAY is National Doctor's Day!

To those who have crossed the path to making sure that women's health research is at the forefront of our efforts, thank you Howell Scholars (current and past), mentors, CEI recipients, speakers and Board Members! 


Healthy women -- and men-- ensure family health. However, a "one-size-fits-all" approach does not apply to medicine when diagnosing and treating women.  Add the fact that women are still underrepresented in clinical trials --which can lead to misdiagnosis and treatment in women's health-- and you have THE recipe for illness disaster!

Personalized medicine needs to consider gender and sex, which ultimately starts with research at its most basic: the cellular level.  By understanding the physiological, psychological and social differences between men and women:

  • Researchers can keep discovering new cures for disease based on the differences between men and women.
  • Doctors can establish the necessary guidelines to treat illness specific to gender and sex –vs. a ‘one size fits all’ approach. 
  • The pharmaceutical industry can develop targeted medications that effectively treat and cure illness in a specific sex-specific manner.
  • Men and women can be informed and become advocates for their own health, and most importantly, their family’s health.   

It is no secret that one of the Howell Foundation's goals is to is to fund undergraduate women's health research scholarships.  The purpose of establishing the Howell scholarship program was two adress 2 basic things:  making sure women's health research got placed on the research map, and getting students excited about following a career in sciences.  As for the results, we are pleased to see that, as of today, the Foundation has provided 224 scholarships and contributed over $608,475 towards boosting undergraduate student research efforts!

The Howell Scholars' research areas range from the most basic of life sciences such as cell biology to creating vaccines and testing altered immune reactions. A good portion of the success of the program is that each student has a mentor professor who specifically guides the student.  The mentor catapults the student's knowledge and skills in ways that couldn't be done otherwise. The students who are selected for scholarships are without exception, tops in their class. It is inspirational to see their passion and their growth.

A strict protocol is followed in the choice of the students, including review of the students' scholarship applications, and quality of supervision during their research work. This supervision has become known as the "Mentor Program." It is the lifeline to the program's success. Each student must have a qualified mentor to direct and guide them. And it also gives them an insight into the processes they will have to follow throughout their career.

Often the results of the student's research are presented at professional conferences or published in peer-reviewed journals.  Thus, in addition to financial support, the student's education and career goals are enhanced, the cutting edge of scientific knowledge is advanced, and a positive contribution is made to the community and the future of the nation.

After all, they are the embodiment of the promise of "Keeping the Women We Love Healthy."

Interested in donating towards women's health research?  


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About the Doris A. Howell Foundation:

The Doris A. Howell Foundation for Women’s Health Research is committed to keeping the women we love healthy, advancing women’s health through research and educating women to be catalysts for improving family health in the community.  The organization does so by funding scholarships to scientists researching issues affecting women’s health;   providing a forum for medical experts, scientists, doctors, researchers, and authors to convey the timely information on topics relevant to women’s health and the health of their families through its Lecture and Evening Series, and by funding research initiatives that will create women’s health awareness and advocacy in the community.    

For more information about the Doris A. Howell Foundation, please visit www.howellfoundation.org. 



As National Nutrition Months comes to an end, the 5 things you can start doing to eat healthier!

Time and time again we have been told that going back to the basics of nutrition IS the healthiest action to take when dealing with health issues.

The fact is -- and all of our speakers have at some point concluded -- that poor nutrition leads to poor health:  cancer, diabetes and heart health leading the list.  According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, unhealthy eating and inactivity account for almost half a million deaths per year (1)

Even though there are general guidelines on nutritional values, there are marked differences between the effects on nutrition between men and women.  There are many variables that affect our nutrition-- our health, our age, what we do for a living and even our own bodies – and recommendations on healthy eating and the amount of nutrients vary accordingly.

Eating healthy is more about discipline; learning to eat healthy food and teaching our family the value of nutrition.   But the one question worth analyzing is if the society we live in conducive to healthy eating?

It seems that we are always in a hurry. As women, most of us have the habit of taking care of others before ourselves.  As parents, we seem to be overwhelmed with all the required activities and demands of our kids.  As professionals, we have learned to work hard and sometimes too much; giving work a priority over family and health with the excuse of getting ahead and the fear of failing.   And half the time we don’t understand how to interpret the nutrition labels in our food – it’s like requiring a bachelor’s degree to even pronounce the ingredients listed!    Organic is great, but greater is the cost!

So where is the balance?  How do we juggle everything-or anything- that we have going on in our lives?

Some great ideas on the importance of healthy eating and reducing inflammation can be found at Dr. Bonakdar's presentation on Nutrition. Additionally, the Office of Women’s Health has the following suggestion for eating at home, going out for dinner and additional resources to make the right choices when deciding about nutritional meals (2):

At Home:

  • Fry foods with a little bit of olive oil rather than butter, margarine, or lots of vegetable oil.
  • Use canola oil when baking.
  • Prepare fish such as salmon or mackerel twice a week.
  • Sprinkle slivered nuts or sunflower seeds on your salads instead of bacon bits.
  • Eat Canadian bacon or lean ham instead of bacon.
  • Try low-fat frozen yogurt instead of regular ice cream.
  • Eat broiled, baked, roasted, or grilled chicken without the skin instead of fried chicken.
  • Add lettuce, tomato, and other vegetables, rather than cheese, to your sandwiches.
  • Eat extra lean ground beef (5% fat) instead of regular ground beef (25% fat).
  • Try whole-wheat tortillas instead of regular flour tortillas.
  • Try whole-wheat or multigrain bread instead of white bread.
  • Try low-fat, low-sodium crackers instead of regular crackers.
  • Eat water-packed rather than oil-packed tuna.
  • Use mustard, catsup, or low-fat mayonnaise on your sandwiches instead of regular mayonnaise.
  • Try making sandwiches with 95% to 97% fat-free lunch meats.
  • Use lemon juice, herb vinegar, or reduced-calorie salad dressings on your salads.
  • Choose non-hydrogenated peanut butter. You can tell that it's nonhydrogenated if there's some oil on top of the peanut butter. Hydrogenated peanut butter is all solid at room temperature.
  • Eat lower-fat cookies, such as graham crackers or fig bars.
  • Choose canned fruits packed in water rather than syrup.
  • Eating out
  • In any restaurant:
  • Ask for salad dressing, gravy, or sauce on the side and use sparingly.
  • Choose main dishes that are broiled, baked, roasted, or grilled, instead of deep-fried or pan-fried.
  • Don't be afraid to make special requests, such as asking that something be cooked with less fat.

When ordering a sandwich:

  • Add lettuce and tomato.
  • Ask for whole-wheat or rye bread.
  • Choose mustard instead of mayonnaise.

At Chinese restaurants:

  • Have brown rice instead white rice.
  • Order a side dish of steamed broccoli.

At fast food places:

  • Order smaller burgers. Skip the cheese and bacon.
  • Order a grilled chicken sandwich.
  • Order garden or grilled chicken salads with low-fat dressings.
  • Choose water or low-fat milk instead of regular soda.

At pizza places:

  • Ask for vegetable toppings, such as mushrooms or peppers, rather than meat toppings.
  • Get whole-wheat crust.
  • Request half the cheese.
  • Eat a salad with low-fat dressing in place of a slice of pizza

So as we approach the weekend and let your hair down, mind your eating, indulge with a healthy dessert and have fun!  Additional Resources can be found here:

(1)    http://www.cspinet.org/nutritionpolicy/nutrition_policy.html#eat
(2)http://www.womenshealth.gov/fitness-nutrition/how-to-eat-for-health/improving-your-food-choices.html

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About the Doris A. Howell Foundation:

The Doris A. Howell Foundation for Women’s Health Research is committed to keeping the women we love healthy, advancing women’s health through research and educating women to be catalysts for improving family health in the community. The organization does so by funding scholarships to scientists researching issues affecting women’s health;   providing a forum for medical experts, scientists, doctors, researchers, and authors to convey the timely information on topics relevant to women’s health and the health of their families through its Lecture and Evening Series, and by funding research initiatives that will create women’s health awareness and advocacy in the community.    

For more information about the Doris A. Howell Foundation, please visit www.howellfoundation.org. 

Friday, March 24, 2017

Inside the mind of an MD, and... our youngest Howell Board Member: can you see the brain cells firing?


Jessica Zhang is a newly minted MD serving on our Board of Directors. It is amazing how many things she is able to do for the Howell Foundation, all while pursuing her residency in Emergency Medicine at San Francisco General Hospital/UCSF.

The philosophy of life of this young doctor is, quite frankly, contagious.  Taking a preventive approach on the road to personalized medicine is, perhaps, the most important factor in achieving health.  But that is just my opinion!  Read the wise words of Dr. Zhang, who no doubt will become one of THE best doctors!

"My hope is that my future career is filled with sudden and unpredictable accidents – this sounds terrible, but hear me out.

There are two ways to approach medicine.  The first is to react to a problem that already exists; the second is to prevent the problem from occurring. Our health care system approaches health from the first perspective. With increasingly rare exception, health is only addressed after you are already sick. On the other hand, things like seat belt laws approach medicine from a place of prevention. The logic being, that if you prevent a problem in the first place, it can prevent cost, suffering, disability, and death.

I imagine most people think my day (or night) as an emergency room doctor consists of sudden illnesses and unspeakable accidents. Things like broken bones, infections, food poisoning, fevers, dog bites, or gunshot wounds. But the majority of what I see is preventable illness. Or, more accurately, the complications of preventable illness. Almost every shift I have patients with kidney failure from diabetes, lung disease from smoking, and heart disease from decades of high blood pressure and excess cholesterol.  In all, traumatic accidents are probably no more than 10% of my career as an emergency room doc.

The five things I wish for my patient are to: eat a healthy diet, exercise, never smoke, try to lose weight and drink five drinks a week. And yes, you read that right.  Those five alcoholic drinks, if spread over the course of a week, are actually beneficial to your health. Binge drinking is not allowed, but that nightly glass of red wine appears to be helping you.

Lets look at some facts - studies that followed hundreds of thousands of people for decades showed that if you ascribe to all five things mentioned above, your risk of heart disease plummets by 80%.  Heart disease includes things like heart attacks, heart failure, high blood pressure, and heart beat irregularities.  If you think that’s good, then consider the fact that those same five things reduce your risk of diabetes by 90%, your risk of dementia (Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s) by 60% and your risk of cancer by 35%.

There is no doubt that it takes effortful intention to do these five things, but it’s a pretty incredible trade off.  The more I understand about the human body, the more I realize the crucial importance of maintaining health and wellness.  As a physician, I hope to see that medicine shifts toward maintaining health and wellness thereby reducing the need of a reactive approach.

My day-to-day job is to treat devastating complications of preventable illness (and the rare traumatic accident).  But my passion projects all focus on trying to stop them from happening at all. The Doris Howell Foundation seeks to educate women about how to achieve wellness for themselves and for their families. By way of direct education or research, it seeks to change our entire approach to healthcare.  I get to be part of that as a board member.  I continue to hope that my future career is filled with sudden and unpredictable events because all of the preventable illness has disappeared.

 'An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure' – proverb by Benjamin Franklin"

With Healthful Wishes

Jessica Zhang, MD
Emergency Medicine Resident at the University of California, San Francisco and Zuckerburg San Francisco General Hospital

Thursday, March 23, 2017

For these young minds, women's health matters!

Dr. Howell (front center) and Dr. Maloy with the 2017 Howell-CSUPERB Scholarship recipients. 


Double the Impact! CSUPERB (California State University Program for Education and Research in Biotechnology) awards a new research grant for each full scholarship the Howell Foundation awards to a CSU undergraduate. A strict protocol is followed in the choice of the students, including review of the students' scholarship applications, and quality of supervision during their research work. This supervision has become known as the "Mentor Program." It is the lifeline to the program's success. Each student must have a qualified mentor to direct and guide them.

The research subjects range from the most basic of life sciences such as cell biology to creating vaccines and testing altered immune reactions. Often the results of the student's research are presented at professional conferences or published in peer-reviewed journals, contributing to the community and the future of women's health nationwide through the advancement of cutting- edge of scientific knowledge.

“The opportunity that the Doris A. Howell Foundation offers is time.  With our scholarships, students can now dedicate the time to conduct the required research to complete their studies; time that would otherwise be spent away from women’s health research” comments Dr. Carole Banka, Co-chair for the Foundation.   All of the students’ research projects are mentored by CSU Faculty.

Together the Howell Foundation and CSUPERB recognize that research experience is critical to recruiting, training and retaining students interested in careers in women's health.  The 2017 Howell-CSUPERB Scholars are:

Norhan Alhajjar (SDSU)
Project: “Characterization of Vaginal Colonization by Staphylococcusaureus”
Mentor: Kelly Doran, Biology

Kim Anh Hoang (CSU, Sacramento)
Project: “Steric Effects in the Computational Modeling of Cyclization Reactions of Enediynones.”
Mentor: Benjamin Gherman, Chemistry

Jennifer Luu (SDSU)
Project: “Genetic Analyses of Mouse Repeats Important in Aggressive Colorectal Cancer”
Mentor: Kathleen McGuire, Biology

Elizabeth Marquez (CPSU, Pomona)
Project: “Effects of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on the Severity of Candida albicans Vulvovaginal Candidiasis in Immunosuppressed Mice”
Mentor: Nancy Buckley, Biology

Susana Najera (SDSU)
Project: “Characterization of a Bacterial Two-Component Sensor Kinase”
Mentor: Kelly Doran, Biology

Grace Prator (CSU, Chico)
Project: “miR-375 has opposing roles in hormone secretion with a-cell and ß-cell”
Mentor: David Keller, Biological Sciences

Layla Ramos (CSU, Long Beach)
Project: “Androgen regulation of calbindin expression in the developing mouse cerebral cortex and hippocampus”
Mentor: Houng-Wei Tsai, Biological Sciences

Puneet Sanghera (San José State University)
Project: “The effects of lipopolysaccharide induced inflammation on spinal cord excitability”
Mentor: Katie Wilkinson, Biological Sciences

Matthew Slarve (CPSU, Pomona)
Project: “In Vitro Modeling of Bacterial and Fungal Lung Infections in Cystic Fibrosis Patients”
Mentor: Jill Adler-Moore, Biological Sciences

Rajan Suasin (CSU, Sacramento)
Project: “The Synthesis and Design of Sulfated Glycodendrimers Against Biofilm Formation”
Mentor: Katherine McReynolds, Chemistry

Miguel Tellez (CSU, Fullerton)
Project: “Purification and characterization of a small copper carrier (SCC) from blood plasma - a structural and physiological study”
Mentor: Maria C Linder, Chemistry & Biochemistry

Please join us in wishing them all the success!  For more information on the Howell Foundation's partnership with CSUPERB CLICK HERE.

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About the Doris A. Howell Foundation:

The Doris A. Howell Foundation for Women’s Health Research is committed to keeping the women we love healthy, advancing women’s health through research and educating women to be catalysts for improving family health in the community.

The organization does so by funding scholarships to students researching issues affecting women’s health; providing a forum for medical experts, scientists, doctors, and researchers to convey timely information on topics relevant to women’s health and the health of their families through its Lecture and Evening Series, and by funding research initiatives that improve the health of under-served women and increase awareness and advocacy in the community.

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How are we doing with our de-cluttering resolutions? The difference between clutter and hoarding and the 5 things you can do to follow up on your spring cleaning.



March is here.  'Spring cleaning' is in the air.  So, how are we doing on the 'cleaning-out-our- (fill in the blank)' resolution?

The Howell Foundation invited Dr. Saxena to speak to us about clutter vs. hoarding last January.  More than a behavior pattern, hoarding is now diagnosed as a stand alone disorder --vs. being diagnosed as a sub category of OCD.  You can read more about his research here.

The many faces of clutter vs. hoarding.

To better emphasize that hoarding is not a 'lazy' attitude, Dr. Saxeena explained that what seems normal for us, discarding items of little or no relevant value, is difficult for many.  It is estimated that between 12 and 19 million individuals suffer from a hoarding behavior in the US.

The reason why Americans hoard varies; some have a percieved notion of needing the items (trying to fix an item for a later use or to sell it), others save an item because it may be used some day, and yet others save it because it was expensive.  The strongest characteristic of hoarding is the emotional attachment that accompanies the need to save an item (because it reminds us of someone).

As to what items we hoard the most, Dr. Saxena mentioned a few:
  • newspapers 
  • books
  • clothes 
  • magazines
  • bills/receipts/statements 
  • bags/storage containers
  • mail
  • catalogs 
  • ads
  • notes and lists
  • memorabilia

Hoarding typically co-occurs with other mental disorders including depression, bipolar disorder and other personality disorders.  Alcholol dependence and obsesive compulsive behaviors complicate its treatment.  Other diagnoses that often accompany hoarding include ADHD, PTSD, phobias, eating disorders, kleptomania, social phobia and anxiety/panic disorder.

The difference between clutter and hoarding lies in a couple of things: additional neuropsychological disorders, and the ability to get rid of items in an easier manner.  The first step in addressing hoarding is to work towards eliminating the stigma that accompanies it.  No, hoarders are not lazy, or losers for that matter. Here is what is known so far:

  • Recent research shows that hoarding can be genetic.  
  • Research has also shown that hoarding tendencies start during teenage years.
  • Hoarding is more present in men than in women.
  • Hoarding is inversley proportional to income levels. 
  • There is a strong co-relation between hoarding and obesity: hoarders are 3 times more likely to be obese.
  • Hoarding is not exclusive to objects, although animal and object hoarding come hand in hand.
  • Hoarders are, in general, socially withdrawn and are older in age.

The risks of hoarding behaviors can be disaterous to your health, anywhere from the ability to exit a building in case of a fire to hazardous substances accumulated.  Along with the hoarded items, many unexepected or residual items can build up, including rat and other animal feces.  If you suspect a friend or family member has a hoarding problem, find a professional in your area that can guide you in understanding the process of hoarding; both physically and mentally. Remember that hoarding is a neurophysiatric disorder, and that there are specific indicators that can help determine if the problem is hoarding, or an excess in clutter.  Attempts to do a friend or famiy member a favor by cleaning out the clutter can exacerbate the psychological stress if the siuation is a hoarding isue.

Clutter often times has an emotion behind it as well.  It is said that the difference between clutter and hoarding is only one degree.  According to the article written by Sara Solovich, experts agree that a "hoarding disorder is present when the behavior causes distress to the individual or interferes with emotional, physical, social, financial or legal well-being."

If this is not the case and, on the other hand, you find yourself dreading walking into a storage area and cleaning it out and do not know where to begin, experts recommend the following:

Have a plan, and stick to it! Mentalize the task.  Set a date.  Set a schedule.  It is easier if you set achievable goals vs. what seems an impossible task!  Decluttering shouldn't be a marathon!  One hour a day either goes by fast, or leads you to continue cleaning away!

Get prepared:  Use this 4-box method to get organized: Sell/Donate, Keep, Throw Away, and Store. It is easier to walk around your home or office with a designated place to place your items.

Removal plan:   Start with small areas and then move to bigger projects.
All of us have a 'junk drawer' full of unused or unneeded items.
Consider your closet and the items you no longer wear or need.
Larger projects?  The garage or the basement.

Clutter prevention:  Clutter is also about getting new itemsor storing new things that have sentimental value.  Think about the need for vs. the sentimental value of an item, where you will store it, how much space it will take.  And most importantly, remember what got your clutter so out of control that you had to spend all this time de-cluttering in the first place!

Make it a habit! Research shows that it takes between 21 and 66 days to create a habit.  Without counting exactly the amount of time, repetition is key.

Alternatively, if you suspect this is a true hoarding problem, we are fortunate to have one of the world's experts in our back yard!  Dr. Saxena is very active in meeting with people to better understand and treat the disorder, and is enrolling subjects in clincal trials.  If you are interested, information about the clinical trials can be found here.

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About the Doris A. Howell Foundation:

The Doris A. Howell Foundation for Women’s Health Research is committed to keeping the women we love healthy, advancing women’s health through research and educating women to be catalysts for improving family health in the community.

The organization does so by funding scholarships to students researching issues affecting women’s health; providing a forum for medical experts, scientists, doctors, and researchers to convey timely information on topics relevant to women’s health and the health of their families through its Lecture and Evening Series, and by funding research initiatives that improve the health of under-served women and increase awareness and advocacy in the community.

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Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Soroptimist International of La Jolla is at it... Again!



Celebrating 70 years of educating, empowering and enabling women in our community socially and economically


Second Bucket List Bash to focus on women in the military and their transition into civilian life



If you haven’t heard about Soroptimist International of La Jolla, you are missing out on the wonderful work they do to educate, empower and enable women in our community.  We know that for a fact! After all, the organization was a key component in creating the Doris A. Howell Foundation for Women’s Health Research.  We have been partners now for almost 25 years! "The group of women that belongs to Soroptimist International of La Jolla is small in number but immense in dedication and imprint on the lives of women. Twenty two years ago SILJ was instrumental in founding the Doris A. Howell Foundation for Women's Health Research and their organization has been our greatest ally in the years that followed. We are proud to be one of the recipients of their generosity and to support all that they do”, comments Dr. Carole Banka, Co-chair of the Howell Foundation.

To be able to support social and economic empowerment for women in their community programs, Soroptimist International of La Jolla will be hosting the Bucket List Bash on May 13th.    Now in its second year, the proceeds will be used to support Veteran and Active Military Women. The emphasis of this program includes volunteering and hands-on mentoring to promote successful transition to civilian life in order to meet the unique needs of military women.

“Soroptimist International of La Jolla is known for our ability to identify and support needs in our community - by our hands on participation, leadership and monetary contributions. When we work together to support a group, we exponentially make a difference in the lives of women in our community”, comments Diana Hill, 2017 President for the organization.  “Military women give so much of their lives so the rest of us can have the freedom we enjoy today!  The least we could do is help them transition into our community”, she concludes.

So make sure you register and help celebrate both, the organization’s 70th anniversary and the women who serve in our military:  
When:  Saturday, May 13th
Where: La Jolla, CA.  
Time: 6:30 PM  

Take a look at last year’s Bucket List Bash and watch the video of the event!
For more information please contact:
Anseth Richards
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About Soroptimist International of La Jolla:
Soroptimist International of La Jolla (SILJ) is a club within the Soroptimist International of the Americas (SIA), a global women’s organization whose members volunteer to transform the lives of women and girls. SIA members number over 80,000 in 130 countries and territories. We are particularly committed to providing women and girls access to the most effective path to self-determination and success: education.   ​Clubs participate in the Dream Programs. These programs ensure women and girls have access to the education and training they need to reach their full potential.