Thursday, May 18, 2017

Celebrating Women’s Health Week… The Body- Mind Connection: Just get moving!


It is no secret that exercise has numerous benefits for our body and our mind.  Going beyond the idea of losing weight and getting into shape, physical activity helps with depression, decreases heart disease and cancer risks, helps with osteoporosis and just overall makes us feel better.

Exercise is one of the critical aspects highlighted in the Women’s Health Week Initiative from the Office of Women’s Health, along with nutrition, being safe, following up with our health through doctor visits, and taking care of our mental health.

The 5 additional benefits of exercise that should get us moving:

1.- Dance like there is no tomorrow!  According to the Alzheimer’s Association, physical activity “improves cognitive function in healthy elderly persons, and potentially reduces the risk of developing cognitive impairment”.   For those of us who have danced to Salsa (even if we dance with our two left feet) know that being graceful is great exercise!

2.- Move over, Miss America!  Working out, --whether dancing, walking or lifting weights makes one feel energized. The increase of self-esteem and feeling good also brings our beauty within, regardless of our weight, physical condition or appearance.    Exercise enhances the blood flow to your skin and makes it glow because sweating helps unclog our pores.  Feeling beautiful is also about being happy with ourselves.  Tips on how to manage our happiness can be found here.

3.- Enjoying the sunset and that trip to the bathroom.  Studies show that exercise improves our digestion by strengthening our abdominal muscles. Regular exercise can help us keep ‘things’ regular.  You’ll be amazed what a short, 20 minute walk after dinner can do for you!

4.- Getting in the groove and being productive.  Exercise decreases stress by reducing cortisol and increasing endorphins, the body’s “feel good” hormone-like substance.  These endorphins also help ease depression.  As far as anxiety, exercise raises your body temperature, which has been shown to calm nerves.  Additional information on how to reduce stress can be found here.

5.- Clearing that ‘London-like’ mind fog.  With stress and anxiety out of the way, clarity tends to kick in.  According to a study conducted by the American College of Sports Medicine, employees who exercise regularly not only increased their productivity, but increased their ability to manage time.  Nothing better than a crisp mind to get into the flow, focus and complete the task at hand!  To learn more on increasing flow and mindfulness click here.  

From the Office of Women's Health, the benefits of moving summarized!


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About the Doris A. Howell Foundation: 
The Doris A. Howell Foundation for Women’s Health Research is committed to keeping the women we love healthy, advancing women’s health through research and educating women to be catalysts for improving family health in the community.

The organization does so by funding scholarships to students researching issues affecting women’s health; providing a forum for medical experts, scientists, doctors, and researchers to convey timely information on topics relevant to women’s health and the health of their families through its Lecture and Evening Series, and by funding research initiatives that improve the health of under-served women and increase awareness and advocacy in the community. 

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Tuesday, May 16, 2017

A tip a day for National Women's Health Week

The need for women's health research is quite clear: women are at higher risk when being diagnosed and treated based on research conducted on men.  Personalized medicine needs to consider gender and sex, which ultimately starts with research at its most basic: the cellular level.  By understanding the physiological, psychological and social differences
between men and women:
  • Researchers can keep discovering new cures for disease based on the differences between men and women.
  • Doctors can establish the necessary guidelines to treat illness specific to gender and sex –vs. a ‘one size fits all’ approach. 
  • The pharmaceutical industry can develop targeted medications that effectively treat and cure illness in a sex-specific manner.
  • Men and women can be informed and become advocates for their own health and, most importantly, their family’s health.   

Understanding women’s health is a win-win for all of us, don’t you think?  
From the Office of Women's Health, information worth the share! 


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About the Doris A. Howell Foundation: 
The Doris A. Howell Foundation for Women’s Health Research is committed to keeping the women we love healthy, advancing women’s health through research and educating women to be catalysts for improving family health in the community.

The organization does so by funding scholarships to students researching issues affecting women’s health; providing a forum for medical experts, scientists, doctors, and researchers to convey timely information on topics relevant to women’s health and the health of their families through its Lecture and Evening Series, and by funding research initiatives that improve the health of under-served women and increase awareness and advocacy in the community. 

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Friday, May 12, 2017

Shout out to the nurses who help care for us!


National Nurse's week is celebrated May 6th to May 12th.  This incredibly noble profession isn't always recognized as it should.  Aside from treating patients that can be very sick or injured, nurses provide advice and sometimes much needed emotional support to patients and their families as well.  Being a nurse goes beyond helping doctors in the diagnosis and treatment of patients.

We have seen many nurses from USD's Hahn School of Nursing conducting research in areas that are critical to our health.  The Howell Foundation celebrates your effort in making sure the rest of us are well taken care of!  To the nurses on our Board of Directors, thank you for all that you do!

Pictured above from left to right Noelle Lipkin Leveque, Dr. Patricia Roth and Tina Campbell
In her project description, Lipkin mentions: " Published research shows between 68 and 97% of health care providers say they have had NO training in identifying or treating victims of human trafficking." This dissertation focuses on the gap in nursing knowledge regarding the health care of people (particularly women) who have been/are victims of human trafficking.  A lack of awareness of human trafficking and lack of training on how to recognize and manage a trafficking situation have been identified as barriers to care for this population. This study offers a first glimpse into the physical and mental health needs and receipt of health services of trafficked women in San Diego,  CA.

Campbell, on the other hand, describes the need to address the health of the caregiver tending to dementia and Alzheimer's patients: " According to the Alzheimer Association, there are about 10 million women currently providing  unpaid  24-hours a day care to someone with Alzheimer's or dementia.  They  are more likely than men to help with the more intense, personal aspects of care, such as bathing, dressing, toileting, and managing incontinence. They receive less family and friend support than male caregivers caring for wives in similar situations. This takes a toll on their health and well­ being. They are concerned about the ability to maintain their own health since becoming a  caregiver. These responsibilities are physically stressful, isolating and commonly linked to depression.

Cheryl Wilson (left) and Jennifer Buechel
“As an Adult Nurse Practitioner, I have first-hand experience in how challenging it is for clinicians to provide routine and preventive care for female military populations in an operational environment, including sexual health and immunization prevention programs.  I have the opportunity as a future nurse scientist to significantly improve health policy and education through research and evidenced-based practice" ~  Jennifer Buechel


Dr. Colombo
Carmen Colombo was the 2013 recipient of the Howell Foundation’s Cheryl A. Wilson Nursing Scholarship. She is a 2014 graduate of the University of San Diego’s Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science with a Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing degree. The Howell Foundation Scholarship provided funding for her research dissertation, “Fetal Heart Monitoring, Nursing Surveillance, and Cesarean Birth”. Dr. Colombo designed this study to determine the role nurses’ monitoring and interpretation of fetal heart rate during labor predicted a Cesarean section outcome. The importance of this study rests on the fact that in 2012, the most recent statistics available, one in three births in the US were by Cesarean section.   Carmen is the Chief Nursing Officer of Sharp Mary Birch Hospital for Women & Newborns.

Dr. Doris Howell (left) with CMDR. Ryan
"There is an old joke that if you don't remember your anesthesia provider they must have done their job well. While there is a bit of truth and humor in that statement, it is my goal as a nurse anesthetist to disprove that joke. Every interaction is a chance to inform our patients of the value of advanced nursing practice and to hear directly what is most concerning about their health. My role as a Navy Nurse has exposed me to a world of diverse health needs and tremendous opportunities for nursing research- I intend to seize the opportunity!”
~ CDR Ryan Nations.


Jodi O'Brien
“My study seeks to reduce women's health risk for breast cancer, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, some (reproductive) cancers, postpartum depression, and rheumatoid arthritis, by investigating infant feeding patterns and nurse factors placing a mother and infant dyad at risk for in-hospital formula supplementation.  Unnecessary in-hospital formula supplementation denies women and infants the full health benefits of breastfeeding exclusivity and increases adverse health risks for both. Given that 97% of all women in the US deliver their infant(s) in the hospital, this study is important to better understand factors influencing breastfeeding outcomes which directly affect women's health. Results will help clinicians and policy makers improve strategies to increase in-hospital breastfeeding exclusivity, and improve the over-all health of women”.
~ Jodi O'Brien

The Cheryl A. Wilson Scholarship was established 6 years ago to honor the current CEO of St. Paul’s for all her work at the Howell Foundation.   She is the Chief Executive Officer of St. Paul's Senior Homes & Services in San Diego. She has a Master’s degree from the University of Redlands, MA and an RN from Prince Henry's Nursing School.  Ms. Wilson has earlier experience as a Critical Care/Operating nurse and consultant to long-term care programs/new programs & facilities development. Prior to her current position, she also was a Pediatric Clinic Supervisor and an instructor for the Nursing Administration examination for Med-Ed and American Nurses College.  Cheryl has served on the Howell Board in many capacities, including that of Chair. She is currently Co-Vice Chair of the Board.

Abigail D'Agostino with Dr. Hala Madanat,
reciprient of 2015's Howell's CEI Grant
Shout out Abigail D'Agostino, who joined the Howell Foundation Board in 2015. In addition to serving as Vice Chair of the Howell Board of Directors, she is also Chair of the Howell Foundation's Community Engagement Initiative.  A Medical Professional with over 12 years of wide range experience in the healthcare ind
ustry, Abigail has a Bachelor of Science in Nursing and a Master’s Degree in Business Administration.   She is a Registered Nurse and has certifications in Adult Critical Care Nursing, Public Health Nurse, End-of-Life Nursing Education, Geriatric Trainer, and Plant-Based Diet Certification from e-Cornell University.  Abigail is currently Director of Patient Care Services at Light Bridge Hospice and Founder and President of Nurses for Health, created to provide a platform to engage nursing professionals in helping to improve the health of our community through education.  Her dedication to the wellbeing of others has made her an awardee of the Worldwide Leaders in Health Care Recognition from the International Nurses Association (2015), and the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Rookie of the Year – Award of Clinical Excellence, from Scripps Memorial Hospital (2005).

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About the Doris A. Howell Foundation:

The Doris A. Howell Foundation for Women’s Health Research is committed to keeping the women we love healthy, advancing women’s health through research and educating women to be catalysts for improving family health in the community.

The organization does so by funding scholarships to scientists researching issues affecting women’s health; providing a forum for medical experts, scientists, doctors, researchers, and authors to convey the timely information on topics relevant to women’s health and the health of their families through its Lecture and Evening Series, and by funding research initiatives that will create women’s health awareness and advocacy in the community.

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Thursday, April 20, 2017

The future cure of infectious disease could be in ourselves!




The Howell Foundation hosted its first North County event with key note speaker Janelle Ayers, Ph.D from the Salk Institute, who walked us through the history of the development of antibiotic resistance and how we fight disease in the twenty first century.  She is currently researching the pathways to winning the war against antibiotic resistance in bacterial infections.

In the continuous fight to beat infectious disease, history has shown us that the use of antibiotics will kill the infection, along with the healthy bacteria that might keep us from fighting the infection.  Bacteria have genetic mutations that are resistant to antibiotics, and we, in turn, just keep on developing antibiotics to rid new strains of bacteria.  We are running out of of options in antibiotic development to beat infectious disease.  And the cycle continues...

So the question still remains:  will our bodies be able to fight infectious disease on their own?  Her answer is YES!  For Dr. Ayers, it's all about how we SURVIVE bacterial infections -- vs. how do we FIGHT them.  "Treatment of infectious disease in the US relies on antibiotics for successful treatment", comments Ayers.

Her research is based on history.  She referenced the treatment of tuberculosis at the beginning of the 20th century, when the 'sanitarium movement' sought to treat the disease with the basics:  complete rest, good nutrition and plenty of sun.  Granted this treatment lasted for a year, but it does shed light on the fact that in today's world a patient with TB would be able to get cured without the use of antibiotics!

When we get an infection, our immune system is capable of recognizing it, engaging a series of interactions to fight against it; sometimes damaging our organs.  The antibiotic will kill the pathogen creating the infection, but will not address the potential organ damage the infection creates.  Dr. Ayers' theory centers around strengthening the pathology of the organ(s) during the infection and harness them for therapeutic purposes; perhaps develop drugs that can address the physiological damage of an infectious disease. "Our bodies encode a defense system to fight disease.  By understanding how it works and what genes are involved in creating this 'defense system', we can leverage research results to treat both infectious and non-infectious disease."

Enter the human microbiome and the trillions of microbes and bacterial species that live in our bodies.  Research shows that the microbiome universe is responsible for optimal physiological function and health.  A healthy microbiome will have a positive impact in both our immune and metabolic systems, as well as intestinal, brain, and lung function.  On the contrary, changes in the microbiome have been associated with diseases such as autism, asthma, cancer, diabetes, and arthritis.   Our microbiome IS responsible for turning on these 'damage control' mechanisms in our bodies to ensure health.  The challenge continues to be the separation of microbes from healthy and sick bodies to learn which microbes are protective against disease, and to potentially utilize isolated microbes for drug design.

Dr. Ayres's lab put the theory to the test.  After inserting bacterial pneumonia-induced pathogens in mice, it was discovered that although antibiotics had taken care of the infections, the muscle-wasting effect of the infection was still present.  Furthermore, when introducing E-coli bacterium into the infected body, its own 'defense mechanism' was able to heal the infected mice and minimized the muscle wasting effect of the infection.  

Although the results of this approach were highly positive, some additional approaches can sometimes be... well, plain and 'unsophisticated' for some.  Dr. Ayers is researching 'poop' as medicine to understand the role microbes play as damage control mechanisms in hopes to develop a preventive approach to infectious disease.  It is not the first time we have heard about this before.  In 2015, the Howell Foundation hosted Dr. Highlander, who was gracious enough to introduce novel treatment of bacterial disease through the use of poop pills and fecal transplants during lunch!

But going back the Salk Institute and Dr. Ayers' research lab, ongoing efforts to treat infectious disease with the use of microbes include pre-clinical trials with animals that suffer from insulin resistance, sepsis, salmonella, poor cardiac function, pneumonia and inflammatory bowel disease, just to mention a few.  The conclusion is concise: the way to fight infectious disease and the overuse of antibiotics is through our own microbes.  A healthy biome is the cornerstone of our health!


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About the Doris A. Howell Foundation:

The Doris A. Howell Foundation for Women’s Health Research is committed to keeping the women we love healthy, advancing women’s health through research and educating women to be catalysts for improving family health in the community.

The organization does so by funding scholarships to students researching issues affecting women’s health; providing a forum for medical experts, scientists, doctors, and researchers to convey timely information on topics relevant to women’s health and the health of their families through its Lecture and Evening Series, and by funding research initiatives that improve the health of under-served women and increase awareness and advocacy in the community.

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Thursday, March 30, 2017

TODAY is National Doctor's Day!

To those who have crossed the path to making sure that women's health research is at the forefront of our efforts, thank you Howell Scholars (current and past), mentors, CEI recipients, speakers and Board Members! 


Healthy women -- and men-- ensure family health. However, a "one-size-fits-all" approach does not apply to medicine when diagnosing and treating women.  Add the fact that women are still underrepresented in clinical trials --which can lead to misdiagnosis and treatment in women's health-- and you have THE recipe for illness disaster!

Personalized medicine needs to consider gender and sex, which ultimately starts with research at its most basic: the cellular level.  By understanding the physiological, psychological and social differences between men and women:

  • Researchers can keep discovering new cures for disease based on the differences between men and women.
  • Doctors can establish the necessary guidelines to treat illness specific to gender and sex –vs. a ‘one size fits all’ approach. 
  • The pharmaceutical industry can develop targeted medications that effectively treat and cure illness in a specific sex-specific manner.
  • Men and women can be informed and become advocates for their own health, and most importantly, their family’s health.   

It is no secret that one of the Howell Foundation's goals is to is to fund undergraduate women's health research scholarships.  The purpose of establishing the Howell scholarship program was two adress 2 basic things:  making sure women's health research got placed on the research map, and getting students excited about following a career in sciences.  As for the results, we are pleased to see that, as of today, the Foundation has provided 224 scholarships and contributed over $608,475 towards boosting undergraduate student research efforts!

The Howell Scholars' research areas range from the most basic of life sciences such as cell biology to creating vaccines and testing altered immune reactions. A good portion of the success of the program is that each student has a mentor professor who specifically guides the student.  The mentor catapults the student's knowledge and skills in ways that couldn't be done otherwise. The students who are selected for scholarships are without exception, tops in their class. It is inspirational to see their passion and their growth.

A strict protocol is followed in the choice of the students, including review of the students' scholarship applications, and quality of supervision during their research work. This supervision has become known as the "Mentor Program." It is the lifeline to the program's success. Each student must have a qualified mentor to direct and guide them. And it also gives them an insight into the processes they will have to follow throughout their career.

Often the results of the student's research are presented at professional conferences or published in peer-reviewed journals.  Thus, in addition to financial support, the student's education and career goals are enhanced, the cutting edge of scientific knowledge is advanced, and a positive contribution is made to the community and the future of the nation.

After all, they are the embodiment of the promise of "Keeping the Women We Love Healthy."

Interested in donating towards women's health research?  


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About the Doris A. Howell Foundation:

The Doris A. Howell Foundation for Women’s Health Research is committed to keeping the women we love healthy, advancing women’s health through research and educating women to be catalysts for improving family health in the community.  The organization does so by funding scholarships to scientists researching issues affecting women’s health;   providing a forum for medical experts, scientists, doctors, researchers, and authors to convey the timely information on topics relevant to women’s health and the health of their families through its Lecture and Evening Series, and by funding research initiatives that will create women’s health awareness and advocacy in the community.    

For more information about the Doris A. Howell Foundation, please visit www.howellfoundation.org. 



As National Nutrition Months comes to an end, the 5 things you can start doing to eat healthier!

Time and time again we have been told that going back to the basics of nutrition IS the healthiest action to take when dealing with health issues.

The fact is -- and all of our speakers have at some point concluded -- that poor nutrition leads to poor health:  cancer, diabetes and heart health leading the list.  According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, unhealthy eating and inactivity account for almost half a million deaths per year (1)

Even though there are general guidelines on nutritional values, there are marked differences between the effects on nutrition between men and women.  There are many variables that affect our nutrition-- our health, our age, what we do for a living and even our own bodies – and recommendations on healthy eating and the amount of nutrients vary accordingly.

Eating healthy is more about discipline; learning to eat healthy food and teaching our family the value of nutrition.   But the one question worth analyzing is if the society we live in conducive to healthy eating?

It seems that we are always in a hurry. As women, most of us have the habit of taking care of others before ourselves.  As parents, we seem to be overwhelmed with all the required activities and demands of our kids.  As professionals, we have learned to work hard and sometimes too much; giving work a priority over family and health with the excuse of getting ahead and the fear of failing.   And half the time we don’t understand how to interpret the nutrition labels in our food – it’s like requiring a bachelor’s degree to even pronounce the ingredients listed!    Organic is great, but greater is the cost!

So where is the balance?  How do we juggle everything-or anything- that we have going on in our lives?

Some great ideas on the importance of healthy eating and reducing inflammation can be found at Dr. Bonakdar's presentation on Nutrition. Additionally, the Office of Women’s Health has the following suggestion for eating at home, going out for dinner and additional resources to make the right choices when deciding about nutritional meals (2):

At Home:

  • Fry foods with a little bit of olive oil rather than butter, margarine, or lots of vegetable oil.
  • Use canola oil when baking.
  • Prepare fish such as salmon or mackerel twice a week.
  • Sprinkle slivered nuts or sunflower seeds on your salads instead of bacon bits.
  • Eat Canadian bacon or lean ham instead of bacon.
  • Try low-fat frozen yogurt instead of regular ice cream.
  • Eat broiled, baked, roasted, or grilled chicken without the skin instead of fried chicken.
  • Add lettuce, tomato, and other vegetables, rather than cheese, to your sandwiches.
  • Eat extra lean ground beef (5% fat) instead of regular ground beef (25% fat).
  • Try whole-wheat tortillas instead of regular flour tortillas.
  • Try whole-wheat or multigrain bread instead of white bread.
  • Try low-fat, low-sodium crackers instead of regular crackers.
  • Eat water-packed rather than oil-packed tuna.
  • Use mustard, catsup, or low-fat mayonnaise on your sandwiches instead of regular mayonnaise.
  • Try making sandwiches with 95% to 97% fat-free lunch meats.
  • Use lemon juice, herb vinegar, or reduced-calorie salad dressings on your salads.
  • Choose non-hydrogenated peanut butter. You can tell that it's nonhydrogenated if there's some oil on top of the peanut butter. Hydrogenated peanut butter is all solid at room temperature.
  • Eat lower-fat cookies, such as graham crackers or fig bars.
  • Choose canned fruits packed in water rather than syrup.
  • Eating out
  • In any restaurant:
  • Ask for salad dressing, gravy, or sauce on the side and use sparingly.
  • Choose main dishes that are broiled, baked, roasted, or grilled, instead of deep-fried or pan-fried.
  • Don't be afraid to make special requests, such as asking that something be cooked with less fat.

When ordering a sandwich:

  • Add lettuce and tomato.
  • Ask for whole-wheat or rye bread.
  • Choose mustard instead of mayonnaise.

At Chinese restaurants:

  • Have brown rice instead white rice.
  • Order a side dish of steamed broccoli.

At fast food places:

  • Order smaller burgers. Skip the cheese and bacon.
  • Order a grilled chicken sandwich.
  • Order garden or grilled chicken salads with low-fat dressings.
  • Choose water or low-fat milk instead of regular soda.

At pizza places:

  • Ask for vegetable toppings, such as mushrooms or peppers, rather than meat toppings.
  • Get whole-wheat crust.
  • Request half the cheese.
  • Eat a salad with low-fat dressing in place of a slice of pizza

So as we approach the weekend and let your hair down, mind your eating, indulge with a healthy dessert and have fun!  Additional Resources can be found here:

(1)    http://www.cspinet.org/nutritionpolicy/nutrition_policy.html#eat
(2)http://www.womenshealth.gov/fitness-nutrition/how-to-eat-for-health/improving-your-food-choices.html

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About the Doris A. Howell Foundation:

The Doris A. Howell Foundation for Women’s Health Research is committed to keeping the women we love healthy, advancing women’s health through research and educating women to be catalysts for improving family health in the community. The organization does so by funding scholarships to scientists researching issues affecting women’s health;   providing a forum for medical experts, scientists, doctors, researchers, and authors to convey the timely information on topics relevant to women’s health and the health of their families through its Lecture and Evening Series, and by funding research initiatives that will create women’s health awareness and advocacy in the community.    

For more information about the Doris A. Howell Foundation, please visit www.howellfoundation.org. 

Friday, March 24, 2017

Inside the mind of an MD, and... our youngest Howell Board Member: can you see the brain cells firing?


Jessica Zhang is a newly minted MD serving on our Board of Directors. It is amazing how many things she is able to do for the Howell Foundation, all while pursuing her residency in Emergency Medicine at San Francisco General Hospital/UCSF.

The philosophy of life of this young doctor is, quite frankly, contagious.  Taking a preventive approach on the road to personalized medicine is, perhaps, the most important factor in achieving health.  But that is just my opinion!  Read the wise words of Dr. Zhang, who no doubt will become one of THE best doctors!

"My hope is that my future career is filled with sudden and unpredictable accidents – this sounds terrible, but hear me out.

There are two ways to approach medicine.  The first is to react to a problem that already exists; the second is to prevent the problem from occurring. Our health care system approaches health from the first perspective. With increasingly rare exception, health is only addressed after you are already sick. On the other hand, things like seat belt laws approach medicine from a place of prevention. The logic being, that if you prevent a problem in the first place, it can prevent cost, suffering, disability, and death.

I imagine most people think my day (or night) as an emergency room doctor consists of sudden illnesses and unspeakable accidents. Things like broken bones, infections, food poisoning, fevers, dog bites, or gunshot wounds. But the majority of what I see is preventable illness. Or, more accurately, the complications of preventable illness. Almost every shift I have patients with kidney failure from diabetes, lung disease from smoking, and heart disease from decades of high blood pressure and excess cholesterol.  In all, traumatic accidents are probably no more than 10% of my career as an emergency room doc.

The five things I wish for my patient are to: eat a healthy diet, exercise, never smoke, try to lose weight and drink five drinks a week. And yes, you read that right.  Those five alcoholic drinks, if spread over the course of a week, are actually beneficial to your health. Binge drinking is not allowed, but that nightly glass of red wine appears to be helping you.

Lets look at some facts - studies that followed hundreds of thousands of people for decades showed that if you ascribe to all five things mentioned above, your risk of heart disease plummets by 80%.  Heart disease includes things like heart attacks, heart failure, high blood pressure, and heart beat irregularities.  If you think that’s good, then consider the fact that those same five things reduce your risk of diabetes by 90%, your risk of dementia (Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s) by 60% and your risk of cancer by 35%.

There is no doubt that it takes effortful intention to do these five things, but it’s a pretty incredible trade off.  The more I understand about the human body, the more I realize the crucial importance of maintaining health and wellness.  As a physician, I hope to see that medicine shifts toward maintaining health and wellness thereby reducing the need of a reactive approach.

My day-to-day job is to treat devastating complications of preventable illness (and the rare traumatic accident).  But my passion projects all focus on trying to stop them from happening at all. The Doris Howell Foundation seeks to educate women about how to achieve wellness for themselves and for their families. By way of direct education or research, it seeks to change our entire approach to healthcare.  I get to be part of that as a board member.  I continue to hope that my future career is filled with sudden and unpredictable events because all of the preventable illness has disappeared.

 'An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure' – proverb by Benjamin Franklin"

With Healthful Wishes

Jessica Zhang, MD
Emergency Medicine Resident at the University of California, San Francisco and Zuckerburg San Francisco General Hospital